english

English Graduate Programs:

Resume Tips or Strategies:

Resume tips for Teachers from College of William and Mary

  • Highlight your experience with school-aged populations. Whether or not you’re certified to teach, highlighting any experience you’ve had working with school-aged children is an important step in making yourself an attractive candidate to a school system or private institution. Examples of working with such populations include:
    • Camp counseling
    • Life guarding
    • Tutoring/Training any employees less experienced than yourself
    • Coaching/Working at local recreation centers or YMCA facilities
  • Include any sports or activities you would be willing/able to offer. If you’ve been a member of a sports team, or even if you simply enjoy a sport or activity for recreation, put it on a résumé. All schools offer afternoon activities for their students and are almost always looking for people to sponsor them. Be sure to mention activities such as:
    • Drama
    • Team Sports
    • Personal fitness activities like horseback riding, weight lifting or aerobics
    • Playing an instrument
    • Working on a high school, community, or college newspaper/radio station/yearbook
    • Organizing special events (dances, graduation ceremonies, club meetings)

Here are some resume tip from Georgetown University:

  • Research
    • Gathering information
    • Using a variety of resources
    • Interpreting data
    • Original analysis
    • Defining problems
    • Summarizing and presenting information
    • Understanding personal, social and cultural dynamics
  • Critical Thinking
    • Reading critically
    • Thinking independently
    • Recognizing unnoticed patterns and structures
    • Understanding components of complex problems
    • Offering diverse perspectives
    • Synthesizing themes
  • Communication
    • Comparing/contrasting interpretations
    • Language skills
    • Summarizing ideas
    • Writing effectively
    • Conveying complex information
    • Editing
    • Articulating ideas/theories
    • Creating persuasive arguments
    • Using precise language

Career Resources for English Majors:

Career options:

  • Master’s Degree:
    • Writer/Author
    • Editor
    • Teacher
    • Poet
    • Historian
  • PhD:
    • Professor
    • Dean

Salary and job outlook information

Position Degree 2014 Median Pay Percent Growth 2014-2024
Writers & Authors Bachelor’s $58,850 per year 2%
Technical Writers Bachelor’s $69,030 per year 10%
Editors Bachelor’s $54,890 per year -5%
Public Relations Specialists Bachelor’s $55,680 per year 6%
Librarians Master’s $56,170 per year 2%
High School Teachers Bachelor’s $56,310 per year 6%
Middle School Teachers Bachelor’s $54,940 per year 6%

  • How to prepare for graduate school:
    • Create a portfolio of your written works and articles for view
    • Keep a high GPA
  • Things to consider about graduate school when looking/applying:
    • Faculty Specialties and Experience: Who’s teaching here, and would I want to work with them? Look up professor names on the university website, and then do a search to get a sense of their interests. What are the strengths of the program (18th-century British? post-modern theory? composition studies?) If you know what you want to specialize in, it makes sense to seek out departments that are strong in this area; if you’re not sure what your focus will be, you might decide on a program that has depth in a broad range of literature specialties. Also consider the age-distribution of the faculty; older faculty often have a treasure-trove of expertise, while younger faculty are often at the forefront of new movements in literary criticism (of course, the reverse can be true as well).
    • Program Structure: What are the various stages of the program? Is there a terminal M.A., or is the Master’s awarded as the first stage of PhD completion? Is there an M.A. thesis, M.A. exam, or both? Is it possible to start as an MFA student and then transfer to the PhD program? How easy is it to apply courses in other disciplines to the degree in English? What courses, languages, exams, and writing are required? What is the typical teaching load, and what kind of resources, training and support does the department provide to its grad student teachers?
    • Completion Rates: What is the average time to degree in this program? What are the rates of attrition? How many entering students complete the PhD, and how many exit the program before, at, or after the MA? What steps has the department taken to boost completion rates?
    • Grad Student Satisfaction: How happy are the grad students in the program? What are the working conditions? Is the department growing or shrinking? How much do faculty and students collaborate? Spend time talking to grads (by phone, email or in person) to find out how supportive or competitive, divisive or harmonious the atmosphere is, both within the student body and within the faculty. (The program director or coordinator can give you contact information.)
    • Career Placement: How many PhD students land tenure-track jobs as English professors, and at what kinds of institutions (research universities, 4-year liberal arts colleges, community colleges)? How long are students from this program on the job market after completing the PhD? What other kinds of jobs do students from this program secure? What resources and support does the program provide to students while they are on the job market?
    • Library Resources: How large is the library and its loan network? What are their literature holdings? What special archives and collections do they own? What library privileges are available to graduates? Financial Support: How much does this education cost, and how will I pay for it? (Given the current job market, you should not go into major debt to get a PhD in English.) What scholarships, fellowships, or assistantships are available, and how many students typically qualify? What salary is provided for assistantships, and how many years of funding are guaranteed? What other part-time teaching opportunities are available in the area? Are the costs of research and conference travel covered? Does the department provided subsidized housing?
    • Health Benefits: What kind of insurance coverage is available, for self and family? Historically, graduate students have had relatively poor health benefits, but this is increasingly changing through the unionizing efforts of grad students.
    • Location: Where is the university, and would I want to live there? Is the distance from friends and family an important factor for me? What social and cultural perks does the university and the city have to offer?

Common interview questions for Editors from Brigham Young University

  • In your view, what is the role of an editor?
  • How would you define success as an editor?
  • What kinds of editing (or what part of editing) do you most (and least) enjoy? Why?
  • When someone gives you something to edit, what do you do?
  • How has your education helped you prepare for this position?
  • How has your work experience helped you prepare for this position? [At this point, the interviewer might want to discuss your past and present editing work.]
  • Do you consider yourself stronger at the detail part of editing (such as proofreading and copy editing) or at the substantive part of editing (such as revising for purpose, audience, organization, clarity, or accuracy of ideas)? What are your strengths (and weaknesses) in working with writers (also designers, other editors, etc.)? Think about a difficult person you’ve had to work with. What made that person difficult to work with? How did you deal with the difficulty?
  • Tell us about an editing project that has brought you a lot of satisfaction.
  • What would the ideal editing job be for you?
  • How do you maintain interest in the routine or even mundane parts of editing, such as source checking, proofreading, and indexing?
  • What publications of ours are you most familiar with? What suggestions do you have for improving the content and editing of those publications?
  • If you were editing a publication that will go to a broad audience, what would you do to help it be understandable to less-educated readers without being boring or condescending to more educated readers?
  • At one extreme, editors can fight for every comma; at the other extreme, they can cave in at the least resistance from a writer. Which way do you tend? How do you determine when to stand up for an editorial change that someone challenges?
  • As editors we’re also project managers. How would you deal with other team members who weren’t doing their part or weren’t keeping the project on schedule?

Common interview questions for English Teachers

  • Describe any school experience you have had, particularly in student teaching (or in another teaching position) that has prepared you for a full-time position at our school.
  • How would you integrate technology into the curriculum you would teach?
  • Describe any innovative projects you have been involved in developing.
  • Give an example of how you have used cooperative learning in your classroom
  • Describe any specific areas of strength within your content area (e,g., Physical Science, Writing Workshop, Algebra, etc.).
  • If you could teach just one grade level and subject within your content area, what would you choose? Why?
  • What sorts of assessment, both formal and informal, do you view as being important indicators of successful performance for students learning your content area?
  • If you could teach any novel, what would it be and what would your students be doing?
  • How do you adjust for reading level differences within your classroom?

  • Create a portfolio of written works, poems, short stories, articles, etc. you have written and be able to provide employers with a samples of your writing to showcase your abilities. (Don’t use unfinished works, works that have grades on them, or have edits/marks on them)
  • Develop a specialty area of interest via additional coursework and/or work experience for greater marketability within that specific career field.
  • Write for campus publications such as college newspapers, magazines, or departmental/program newsletters
  • Develop speaking and debate skills.
  • Volunteer to assist or tutor students in the writing center
  • Supplement curriculum with business and statistics courses if interested in a Public Relations or Marketing career

  • Yale University:
    • Classics (M.A., M.Phil., PhD.)
    • Comparative Literature (PhD.)
    • East Asian Languages and Literature (PhD.)
    • English Language and Literature (PhD.)
    • Italian Language and Literature (PhD.)
    • Slavic Language and Literature (PhD.)
  • University of Connecticut:
    • Curriculum and Instruction: English Education (M.A., PhD.)
    • English (M.A., PhD.)
    • English: American Studies (M.A.)
    • Italian Cultural and Literary Studies (M.A., PhD.)
    • Comparative Literacy and Cultural Studies (M.A., PhD.)
    • Classical, Ancient, and Mediterranean Studies (M.A.)
  • Boston University:
    • Creative Writing (M.F.A.)
    • Editorial Studies (M.A., PhD.)
    • English (M.A., M.A./J.D., PhD.)
    • Playwriting (M.F.A.)
    • French Language & Literature (M.A., PhD.)
    • Hispanic Language & Literatures (M.A., PhD.)
  • Brandeis University:
    • Ancient Greek & Roman Studies (Classical Studies) (M.A.)
    • Comparative Humanities (M.A.)
    • English (M.A., Ph.D.)
    • Near Eastern and Judaic Studies (M.A., Ph.D.)
  • Northeastern University:
    • English (M.A., PhD.)
  • University of Virginia:
    • Classics (PhD.)
    • Creative Writing (M.F.A.)
    • English (M.A., PhD.)
    • German Languages and Literature (M.A., PhD.)
    • Middle Eastern and South Asian Languages and Literature (M.A.)
    • Slavic Languages and Literatures (M.A., PhD.)
  • New York University:
    • Classics (M.A., PhD.)
    • Comparative Literature (M.A., PhD.)
    • Creative Writing (M.A., M.F.A.)
    • Creative Writing in Spanish (M.A., M.F.A.)
    • English and American Literature (M.A., PhD.)
    • Journalism (M.A.)
    • Library and Information Science (M.A.)
  • Fordham University:
    • Playwriting (M.F.A.)
    • Classics (M.A.)
    • Medieval Latin (PhD.)
    • English (M.A., PhD.)
  • Syracuse University:
    • Arts Journalism (M.A.)
    • Composition and Cultural Rhetoric (PhD.)
    • Creative Writing (Fiction) (M.F.A.)
    • Creative Writing (Poetry) (M.F.A.)
    • English (M.A./Ph.D.)
    • English Education: Preparation 7-12 (M.S.)
    • Library and Information Science (M.S.)
    • Library and Information Science: School Library Media (M.S.)
    • Literacy Ed, Birth to Grade 12 (M.S.)
    • Literacy Education (Ph.D.)
  • Brown University:
    • Classics (PhD.)
    • Comparative Literature (PhD.)
    • English (PhD.)
    • Literary Arts (M.A.)
  • Duke University:
    • Teaching (M.A.)
    • Humanities (M.A.)
    • Classical Studies (PhD.)
    • English (PhD.)
    • Literature (PhD.)
  •  University of Michigan – Anna Arbor:
    • Classical Studies (M.A., M.A.T., PhD.)
    • Comparative Literature (PhD.)
    • Creative Writing (M.F.A.)
    • English Language and Literature (PhD.)
    • English and Education (PhD.)